This Tuesday 15th March – Aristea Fotopoulou ‘Feminist networks around egg donation policy shifts’

NGENDER Seminar 15th March in SB317 (University of Sussex), at 1pm

Speaker: Aristea Fotopoulou

Title: ‘Feminist publics and policy shifts around egg donation’

Chair: Dr. Kate O’Riordan

Abstract

Feminist politics have a long historical engagement with reproductive technologies. This paper studies some emerging networks relating to policy shifts around the issues of egg donation and trade, for reproduction and genetic research in the UK. My question is how we can think about feminist politics in a world which is increasingly saturated by information and biological technologies.

The paper briefly traces feminist responses to policy shifts in the 1980s and focuses on responses to the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) consultations for the review of donor payment in 2006 and in 2011. It analyses various texts, including online campaign sites, in terms of their themes, ideological claims and encouraged readings. In this process, I examine the specificities of contemporary interventions and the continuities with earlier ones.

The paper concludes by noting the kinds of political subjectivities which are being enabled in the observed networks.

Biography

Aristea Fotopoulou (Doctoral Candidate in Media and Cultural Studies, Sussex) is researching the impact of digital media and information technologies on understandings and expressions of feminist and queer politics.

NGENDER Seminar 15th March

Speaker: Aristea Fotopoulou

Title: ‘Feminist publics and policy shifts around egg donation’

Chair: Dr. Kate O’Riordan

Abstract

Feminist politics have a long historical engagement with reproductive technologies. This paper studies some emerging networks relating to policy shifts around the issues of egg donation and trade, for reproduction and genetic research in the UK. My question is how we can think about feminist politics in a world which is increasingly saturated by information and biological technologies.

 

The paper briefly traces feminist responses to policy shifts in the 1980s and focuses on responses to the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) consultations for the review of donor payment in 2006 and in 2011. It analyses various texts, including online campaign sites, in terms of their themes, ideological claims and encouraged readings. In this process, I examine the specificities of contemporary interventions and the continuities with earlier ones.

 

The paper concludes by noting the kinds of political subjectivities which are being enabled in the observed networks.

 

Biography

 

Aristea Fotopoulou (Dphil Candidate in Media and Cultural Studies, Sussex) is researching the impact of digital media and information technologies on understandings and expressions of feminist and queer politics.

NGENDER Seminar 15th March

Speaker: Aristea Fotopoulou

Title: ‘Feminist publics and policy shifts around egg donation’

Chair: Dr. Kate O’Riordan

Abstract

Feminist politics have a long historical engagement with reproductive technologies. This paper studies some emerging networks relating to policy shifts around the issues of egg donation and trade, for reproduction and genetic research in the UK. My question is how we can think about feminist politics in a world which is increasingly saturated by information and biological technologies.

The paper briefly traces feminist responses to policy shifts in the 1980s and focuses on responses to the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) consultations for the review of donor payment in 2006 and in 2011. It analyses various texts, including online campaign sites, in terms of their themes, ideological claims and encouraged readings. In this process, I examine the specificities of contemporary interventions and the continuities with earlier ones.

The paper concludes by noting the kinds of political subjectivities which are being enabled in the observed networks.

Biography

Aristea Fotopoulou (Dphil Candidate in Media and Cultural Studies, Sussex) is researching the impact of digital media and information technologies on understandings and expressions of feminist and queer politics.

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